Communities. Child & Youth

 

Child & Youth

Monitor reveals a quarter of NZ children live in poverty

The release, on Monday 9 December, of the first annual monitor of child poverty shows that one in four children in Aotearoa New Zealand live in income poverty.  One in six live without basic essentials like fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, decent shoes and visits to the doctor.

- See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/monitor-reveals-a-quarter-of-nz-children-live-in-poverty1.html#sthash.Eb4LwGre.dpu

Nurturing baby: a local breastfeeding health promotion event

In April 2015, Breastfeeding Wairarapa initiated Nurturing Baby - a community breastfeeding promotion event, to encourage community and whanau support.

Sexwise as a model for school-based sexual health promotion: journey for success

In this 55 minute video Evelynn Mann and Gareth McMillan discuss the theatre-based programme in school to support sexual wisdom. Previously known as Sex Matters and Sex Whys, the programme has been running since 2011.

2014 Child Poverty Monitor shows bold action needed

The 2014 Child Poverty Monitor Technical Report provides data and technical information on child poverty measures, economic indicators, and child health measures. It builds on the information previously reported in the Children’s Social Health Monitor.

Worsened poverty figures prompt call for revised social security scheme

4 March 2014: The discovery of a data error in the reporting of household income in New Zealand has prompted the Child Poverty Action Group to call for a revision of the Working for Families.

Inquiry into the determinants of wellbeing for tamariki Māori.  December 2013

Poverty is a major barrier to the wellbeing of tamariki Māori, according to a December 2013 report, from the Māori Affairs Committee.  The authors call on all New Zealanders to support the work being done to improve the wellbeing of our tamariki, and New Zealand as a whole.  They encourage a collaborative approach between agencies and organisations to support the Whānau Ora - and similar - approach to working with Māori whānau.  They unambiguously reject a silo mentality.

Monitor reveals a quarter of NZ children live in poverty

The release, on Monday 9 December 2013, of the first annual monitor of child poverty shows that one in four children in Aotearoa New Zealand live in income poverty.  One in six live without basic essentials like fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, decent shoes and visits to the doctor.

Monitor reveals a quarter of NZ children live in poverty

The release, on Monday 9 December 2013, of the first annual monitor of child poverty shows that one in four children in Aotearoa New Zealand live in income poverty.  One in six live without basic essentials like fresh fruit and vegetables, a warm house, decent shoes and visits to the doctor.

- See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/children-and-young-people.html#sthash.xZ4H2WRk.dpuf

1000 days to get it right

"The first 1000 days of a child’s life are critical to their long term development. One thousand days is also approximately the duration of one term of parliament. So either way we have about 1000 days to get it right. The future of New Zealand depends on it.

Getting it right in those first thousand days means today’s young children are given every opportunity to develop their full potential as healthy, emotionally mature, socially engaged and well-educated, productive adults."

Read the 2011 report from Every Child Counts.

Strengthening the promotion of child health in NZ

Where Health Begins

In a 2009 report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD 2009) “Doing Better for Children”, New Zealand ranked 29th out of 30 countries for child health and safety. In fact, some of New Zealand’s disease patterns among children are closer to those of developing countries’ (PHAC, 2010).   

In October 2010 The Health Promotion and Policy Research Unit at University of Otago, Wellington, hosted a workshop to address the question of what advocates, clinicians, policy-makers and researchers can do to strengthen the promotion of child health in New Zealand. 
Power point presentation

Every Child Counts

A coaliton of individuals and organisations committed to securing a postive future for our children and our nation.

Visit the web site to find out how you can help to ensure children are placed at the centre of policy and planning   Everychildcounts

- See more at: http://www.hauora.co.nz/children-and-young-people.html#sthash.n5Dxc5Xl.dpuf

The Best Start in Life: Achieving effective action on child health and wellbeing

New Zealand is not doing as well for children as are other comparable countries. In fact, New Zealand sits in the bottom third in OECD rankings for most child indicators and near the bottom for immunisation coverage and injury rates. New Zealand also has an appalling rate of child abuse, a factor known to lead to poor health and learning outcomes and behavioural problems.  This 2010 report by the Public Health Advisory Committee to the Ministor of Health outlines the issues facing the health and wellbeing of children in Aotearoa New Zealand.

The importance of the early years - Keeping Up to Date paper 2006

Recent work in fields such as neurobiology and the behavioural and social sciences is providing the evidence to back the long-held intuition that the early years of childhood are key to a person's development, health and wellbeing.  This work, say the authors of this paper, is "edging us towards a fullerunderstanding of the myriad of interrelated ways in which these early years matter and what increase theodds of good – or poor – outcomes."

This HPF Keeping Up to Date peer-reviewed paper by Kirsten Hanna and Ian Hassall suggests that New Zealand's high rate of child abuse and death is due to an attitude that pervades this country's culture.  The authors conclude that "... while children, children’s rights and childrearing continue to have low political status in New Zealand, while having children is seen as a private indulgence rather than an entry into a broader childrearing culture in which we all play a part, we are unlikely to see sustained improvements in outcomes."

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